EISA Zambia: Citizen observation

2016


Election monitors trained, accredited and deployed

EISA Zambia worked with five local organisations in 2016 to carry out the deployment of election monitors in a co-ordinated and synchronised way. However, EISA more particularly focused on the training of 9000 local monitors (Zambian legislation uses the term "monitor" rather than "observer" for local observers). Prior to that, in 2005 and 2009 EISA's Elections and Political Processes undertook work in this field.

With the support of the British Council Zambia Accountability Project (ZAP), EISA worked in partnership with Caritas, the Foundation for Democratic Process (FODEP), the Southern African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (SACC0RD), Transparency International Zambia (TIZ) and the Young African Youth Leadership Initiative (YALI).

The constituency-level trainers who had been trained in the previous period trained over 9,000 monitors countrywide. The monitors were then accredited by the electoral commission and monitored the elections on 11 August 2016. FODEP deployed 5,022 monitors and SACCORD 4,035 monitors. These monitors were deployed in polling stations and collation centres in all 156 constituencies. The two organisations provided the monitors with checklists, forms, T-shirts and allowances to undertake their task. They also set up data centres at their secretariats to capture data from the election monitors. YALI also deployed 25 roving monitors in five provinces and to the national results centre.

2009


Workshop on a common approach in election observation in Africa

Aug 2009

EISA's Elections and Political Processes, as part of it's support for civil society electoral initiatives, held a training workshop on election observation for representatives of CSOs from Africa. Participants were drawn from Zambia, Sudan, Mozambique, Burundi, Algeria, Botswana, Cameroon, Chad, Liberia, Namibia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa and Tanzania. The objective of the workshop was to ensure that African CSOs gradually develop a common approach in election observation as well as to ensure that electoral observation in Africa has a real impact on the democratic development agenda.

The workshop took place in August 2009 in Johannesburg, South Africa. By the end of the training, participants indicated that they had gained a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the value of EISA's election observation methodology.

Workshop on the recruitment and training of observers

May 2009

In May 2009, EISA's Elections and Political Processes, as part of it's support for civil society electoral initiatives, held a workshop for Africa CSOs. The workshop was conducted by EISA, as a member of a joint partnership between International IDEA and other partners of the Network for Enhanced Electoral and Democratic Support (NEEDS) III project. The project aimed at training civil society actors from selected countries which are beneficiaries of the European Union (EU) electoral assistance. The training focused on consolidating election observation methodology in line with international and regional standards and at improving civil society observers' capabilities through the development of a common approach in the recruitment and training of observers.

The training workshop took place in May 2009 in Randburg, South Africa, and was conducted for representatives of CSOs involved in citizen observation in their respective countries from Zambia, Sudan, Kenya, Mozambique, Burundi, Ghana, Namibia, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Algeria, Botswana, Cameroon, Chad, Liberia, Namibia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa and Tanzania.

2005


Election observation by CSOs in SADC

EISA's Elections and Political Processes, as part of it's support for civil society electoral initiatives, has contributed to enhancing the capacity of civil society organisations in the region to plan and conduct election observation mission. Each of the networks that EPP has worked with was able to develop good quality training manuals for the training of election observers. They were also able to plan, assemble and deploy professionally sound citizen election observation missions.

These organisations have become bolder in their approach to election observation and their increasingly effective participation in election reform debates.

All the civil society organisations which directly benefited from the Principles for Election Management, Monitoring and Observation in the SADC Region (PEMMO) training have used it in designing their election observation checklists as well as training their observers. This has led to a great deal of incorporation of PEMMO principles into the actual work of domestic observer groups. Indeed, the signs are that most of the election stakeholders in the region are aware of the principles and some have started to incorporate it into manuals, training materials and assessment tools. A wave of electoral reforms will hopefully close the circle by ensuring that the benchmarks set in PEMMO influence new laws positively.